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In Hinduism, we believe that when a body dies, the soul goes up and then takes (re?) birth. The (re?) birth could be of anything. Say, if I die, depending upon my sins and meritorious deeds, I'll take birth as an insect, fish, dog or even a human.

Hindu sages and gurus have specified the ultimate solution to get rid of the cycle of rebirths. It is called as the Moksha The soul is then with god and free from taking any birth. That's it. The story is finished. This makes the soul divine and free from joys and sorrows. This was an ultimate goal of those sages then.

Wikipedia explains it in a sentence using some words but still does not define one term.

I'm not sure whether this theory exists in any religion, and thus may not get the exact term but in English, anything close to this will work.

closed as off-topic by user6951, user3169, Laure, Esoteric Screen Name, Chenmunka Sep 25 '14 at 11:42

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  • Arguably, you're talking about nirvana, but I'm sure that you already know the word. – Damkerng T. Aug 25 '14 at 7:27
  • @DamkerngT. of course yes! I know that word but it's not English! In my mother=tongue too it's nirvana! – Maulik V Aug 25 '14 at 7:29
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    The whole concept of rebirth is strange and exotic in Western society since Greek and Roman civilisations. Judeism and Christianity do not include the Hindu idea of rebirth at all. Pre-existing European cultures (before Christianity) did not include this kind of concept. Why would there be any word for such a specifically Hindu / Buddhist concept in a language that never had to deal with it? In these cases, the words are simply borrowed from a language that does have the concepts, like nirvana, that is simply an English word by now. – oerkelens Aug 25 '14 at 8:18
  • I know to describe the belief that has been existing since thousands of years, English simply adopts the original word but then whether or not any term available is the question. All yoga postures now have English names! :) – Maulik V Aug 25 '14 at 8:42
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    This question appears to be off-topic because it belongs on a website about Hinduism. – user6951 Sep 24 '14 at 19:41
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As this concept does not exist, to the best of my knowledge, in any Western religion, we don't have a "native" word for it. It's certainly not part of Christianity, Judaism, Islam, or Graeco-Roman beliefs. (There may have been some less-popular religions in the west that believed such a thing, but if so, I'm not familiar with them.)

You can use the word "nirvana", but in English that has come to mean "a state of great happiness" rather than specifically reflecting the Hindu religious belief. I suspect most Westerners would not relate it to the idea of cycles of rebirth. But that's probably the correct word in some technical sense.

When English speaking people want to describe this concept, they typically say "escape from the cycle of rebirth". That is, you have to use a phrase rather than a single word.

Of course if you were writing a book or article about Indian beliefs, you could clarify what you mean by "nirvana" or introduce some other Hindu term and then use it consistently.

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