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Are you taking the train? Yes, I am. I'm visiting my friend.

Does "taking the train" mean "on the train?" I thought take the train meant got on the train, not be on the train.

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    Who said this, to whom. Where did they say it?
    – James K
    Aug 29, 2022 at 20:33

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"Taking the train" means using the train to travel somewhere. So the speaker says that she is travelling by train (and so is on the train), or she plans to travel by train (and so will be on the train). She adds further information, the reason that she is travelling. That is separate information.

You might get a conversation like

What are you going to do on Monday?

I'm going to London.

Are you taking the train? (= are you going to take the train)

Yes. . . I'm going to visit my friend.

Or you could have a phone conversation:

Where are you now?

I'm en route to London.

Are you taking the train? (= are you on the train)

Yes. . . I'm going to visit my friend.

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    I think UK speakers would be more likely to use 'taking' when discussing choice of mode, e.g. 'Are you driving to Cornwall? No, I'm taking the train'. If on the phone in a train I think practically everyone would say 'I'm on the train'. Aug 30, 2022 at 5:51

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