0

I'm a little bit confused by the construction "race into lead" here. The verb "race" means to move at speed". So I understand it as "to move at speed into lead. Could you tell me how you rephrase it?

⏱️ Half Time | Latics 1-2 Burnley

Burnley raced into a two-goal lead through efforts from Jay Rodriguez and Josh Brownhill, but Will Keane's penalty has Latics right back in it at the DW!

#wafc 🔵⚪️ #BELIEVE

2 Answers 2

1

It is a very common metaphor.

In a race, the lead would be a position, a physical configuration, and you could move in and out of it.

In a game it is not a physical position, but metaphorically it can be regarded the same way, so you can race into the lead, you can drop behind, you can lag.,and a host of other positional metaphors.

3
  • Why does the writer use "race" instead of "take?" Usually the phrase is "take the lead" as I know.
    – Jembot
    Aug 31, 2022 at 23:07
  • This question has already been answered for you!! It simply means took the lead very quickly. Sep 1, 2022 at 8:08
  • Take the lead does not use the positional metaphor, which is about moving into the lead. Race into the lead is a dynamic kind of epxression that sports writers are fond of.
    – Colin Fine
    Sep 1, 2022 at 14:54
0

"Lead" in this context means "number of goals ahead."

The suggestion is that this happened early in the game.

Early in the game, Burnley got ahead by two goals, but ...

2
  • why does the writer use "race" instead of "take?" Usually the phrase is "take the lead" as I know.
    – Jembot
    Aug 31, 2022 at 14:51
  • 1
    @Jembot Burnley "raced" (moved quickly) into the lead. It an emphasizes how quickly he took the lead.
    – Esther
    Aug 31, 2022 at 15:13

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .