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I am not sure if the following sentence means that if the more biotin the more amino acid, or vice versa, the more biotin the less amino acid:

This amino acid accumulation in the medium occurs only under biotin-limiting conditions.

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I think it is best here to start at the end and work forward.

This amino acid accumulation in the medium occurs only under biotin-limiting conditions.

First we need to understand what biotin-limiting conditions are. They are conditions which would lead to the quantity of biotin being limited, not necessarily to zero. Note that biotin-limited would imply we are already in the state where biotin has been reduced in some way.

Then working backwards under those conditions and no others the amino acid accumulates in the medium.

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"under biotin limiting conditions" means under conditions where biotin is limited, then amino acids start to accumulate. Therefore you could say the less biotin the more amino acid, but this is also misleading. "limit" is a certain point where something cannot go past else risk something, and is not a ever changing relationship. E.g. once the biotin no. goes below a certain unit, amino acids start to accumulate.

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  • Wouldn't it be 'biotin-limited' conditions, if the meaning is that biotin is in short supply? Sep 1, 2022 at 7:33

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