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I assume that in English schools a number of subjects are taught in a day, like

  • 9:00 - 10:00 English
  • 10:10 - 11:10 Math
  • 11:20 - 12:20 Science

What are standard phrases to express these? What I can think of are:

  • We have English for the first hour.
  • We learn Math for (in?) the second hour.

Are these correct? And/or are there other phrases commonly used?

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  • If by English schools you mean schools in England note that we study maths not math which they study in the US.
    – mdewey
    Sep 9, 2022 at 10:49
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    @mdewey i think sundowner means english speaking schools not english as in england
    – BCLC
    Sep 9, 2022 at 10:51
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    @mdewey Actually I meant just English-speaking, but you mean "maths" is used in England (only? not in other parts of UK?)? How about in writing a time table, say. Do people just write Mathematics (i.e. maths is exclusively colloquial - actually my browser warns maths is a misspelling...)?
    – sundowner
    Sep 9, 2022 at 12:21
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    I think maths is universal in the UK and possibly in some other anglophone countries. People would write it in full in a timetable, title of a degree and so on but a student would say "We have double maths on Friday afternoons" or say "I am doing Maths, Further Maths and Physics at A-level" or say "I am no good at maths".
    – mdewey
    Sep 9, 2022 at 12:35
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    @sundowner see 'US vs. UK: Mathematical Terminology'
    – BCLC
    Sep 9, 2022 at 13:13

1 Answer 1

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Note: Don't forget to upvote the question too!


I think the word you're looking for is period.

Eg1:

I have English for 1st period, Maths for 2nd period and Science for 3rd period.

Eg2

Even Stevens

Sixth Period Even Stevens the Musical

I'm not sure if 'hour' is incorrect, but I so far haven't heard at least in American English. Maybe in British English they say hour?


Updates based on comments:

  1. No, in the UK we too use the word "period" – Peter Jennings

  2. You might also use "block", if there are fewer ...periods....during the day. I'd say that might be more common in high school/college than lower schools, since there are typically fewer slots as the classes tend to be longer. – BruceWayne

  3. At my high school in Michigan in the 2000s, class periods were always called "hours" instead of "periods." Maybe it varies somewhat randomly. – Tanner Swett

  4. To me (Australian ESL), "block" would suggest a time slot which is usually/normally/etc multiple periods; eg. if there are 2 periods before recess, one might say "morning block" to refer to periods 1 and 2 collectively, perhaps on a day with a special program, or a year level which uses them for double periods, or in contexts where the lessons themselves are not directly relevant. – Jiří Baum

  5. At my high school in New York, class periods were 40 minutes with 5 minutes for changes between classrooms, so we definitely would not have said "hour". – David K

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  • 8
    No, in the UK we too use the word "period" Sep 9, 2022 at 11:16
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    You might also use "block", if there are fewer ...periods....during the day. I'd say that might be more common in high school/college than lower schools, since there are typically fewer slots as the classes tend to be longer.
    – BruceWayne
    Sep 9, 2022 at 20:06
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    At my high school in Michigan in the 2000s, class periods were always called "hours" instead of "periods." Maybe it varies somewhat randomly. Sep 9, 2022 at 23:25
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    "Period" seems to be the best option here
    – DialFrost
    Sep 10, 2022 at 0:12
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    To me (Australian ESL), "block" would suggest a time slot which is usually/normally/etc multiple periods; eg. if there are 2 periods before recess, one might say "morning block" to refer to periods 1 and 2 collectively, perhaps on a day with a special program, or a year level which uses them for double periods, or in contexts where the lessons themselves are not directly relevant. Sep 10, 2022 at 11:13

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