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"I don't think these exercises are important so we're gonna skip this part"

"I don't think these exercises are important so we're gonna skip over this part"

Is there any difference between these two sentences? Are they both grammatically sound?

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    We'll skip over / past [the part we don't need] with either preposition or none at all - they all mean exactly the same. OR ...skip to [the next part we're interested in] (where the preposition is necessary for that sense). Commented Sep 20, 2022 at 13:04

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When you use a preposition you have to use the right one. For example, you might say to jump over an obstacle or run past it.

Likewise, you can skip to something, skip past it, skip over it etc. It just depends on what seems most appropriate to the context.

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  • Gotcha. Would the sentence make sense without the preposition tho?
    – Satya
    Commented Sep 20, 2022 at 12:51
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    @Satya Yes. To simply 'skip' something usually means to miss it out.
    – Astralbee
    Commented Sep 20, 2022 at 12:53

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