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In this following context, what does the clause ''this is done'' mean? Does the verb ''done'' stand in for the above verb ''speak''?

Please simplify this to me...

The context:

'Thus, when the Buddhist scriptures speak of persons, or even of the rebirth of persons, this is done only for the sake of easier understanding, and is not to be taken in the sense of ultimate truth.'

Source: Page. 7 ''Fundamentals of Buddhism'' by Nyanatiloka Mahåthera

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    "This" refers to "the speaking of persons, or of the rebirth of persons in the scriptures". "done" is the past participle of "do". Another word for it is "performed". Stories written in the scriptures are there to facilitate your understanding of more complex concepts (ideas that are difficult to grasp without down-to-earth examples). You don't necessarily have to take them literally. Sep 25, 2022 at 15:09

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This is the passive voice

This is done (by something) = Something does this.

In your example the "by something" is implied to be "the Buddhist scriptures", and "do this" is a stand-in for "speak of persons, or even of the rebirth of persons"

So the meaning is

The Buddhist scriptures do this only for the sake of easier understanding.

or even more fully,

The Buddhist scriptures speak of persons, or even of the rebirth of persons, only for the sake of easier understanding, and it is not to be taken in the sense of ultimate truth.'

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this is done only for the sake of easier understanding=this was spoken only for the sake of easier understanding

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