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I came across the following sentence from a ”A study in scarlet” by Arthur Conan Doyle:

We are at a loss as to how he came into the empty house; indeed, the whole affair is a puzzler.

I understand the meaning of at a loss idiom, both from the context that follows it and from the dictionary. I wonder if I can emphasize it using the adverbs much or quite or any appropriate adverb for this context. Would there be valid English?

We are much at a loss as to how...

We are quite at a loss as to how...

Another instance would be the use of at all. I know from the Cambridge Dictionary that it is used to make negatives and questions stronger:

He’s had no food at all.

Why the universe ever existed at all?

Given the fact that we are at a loss looks like a positive but has a negative semantic I wonder if I can say:

We are at a loss at all.

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There are a few ways of emphasising at a loss:

We are quite at a loss.

is OK, but more common is:

We are at quite a loss.

You can use adverbs that mean completely, but only before at:

I am completely at a loss.

I am totally at a loss.

or their equivalent adjectives between a and loss, but this is less common:

I am at a complete loss to explain...

I am at a total loss to explain...

Much doesn't work with at a loss at all, as much refers to a quantity but you are either at a loss or you aren't.

As for at a loss and at all, they just don't go together. If you wanted to use at all in the original sentence you would have to rewrite it as something like:

We have no idea at all as to how he came into the empty house; indeed, the whole affair is a puzzler.

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