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Which one is the most natural: keep your phone at hand, keep your phone on hand or keep your phone with you? For example:

I might call you tonight, so please keep your phone at hand.

I might call you tonight, so please keep your phone on hand.

I might call you tonight, so please keep your phone with you.

What I want to say is that I want a person to keep their phone where they see it and can hear when I call.

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  • Personally, I'd say, "Pay attention to your phone."
    – Juhasz
    Sep 26, 2022 at 20:43
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    Who are you saying this to? What's the context?
    – gotube
    Sep 26, 2022 at 22:09
  • gotube@: The context is I say that to a friend. Sep 27, 2022 at 6:48
  • Keep your phone (turned) on. You can have a phone with you and it would mean nothing if it is not turned on.
    – Lambie
    Dec 1, 2022 at 14:12
  • Or "Keep your phone where you can hear it." Or "Stay near your phone." I'd say "with you" is perhaps best of the given options, as "at hand" or "on hand" could refer to it being a bit further away as long as it's easily accessible.
    – Stuart F
    Dec 4, 2023 at 9:27

1 Answer 1

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In American English, you would say:

Keep your phone with you.

An even more informal version would be:

Hang on to your phone.

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  • Hang on to your phone, means don't trade it in on a new phone just yet. It does not mean, Take your phone with you.
    – EllieK
    Dec 1, 2022 at 15:23
  • Sure it does. "Hang on to your phone and I'll text you when I'm done." Dec 5, 2022 at 8:36

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