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I know 'I got sick/ cold" mean "I became sick/cold" and "sick/cold" are used as adjectives but Here "Chime" said What does "I got sick" mean?

'got' is also interchangeable with 'was' in these constructions (I got sick; I got cold)

And i do know that If i say "I get sick/cold" it means "I become sick/cold" and "sick/cold" are used as adjectives.

Could you pls tell me if "get" is also interchangeable with "is/am/are in these construction (He is sick, I am cold, They are confused)(sick,cold,confused are adjective here

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    @Chaim's comment rather confuses the issue. Stick with your knowledge that I got cold means I became cold. Sep 29, 2022 at 12:31
  • In this context, "get" means "become", which is not the same as "is". If you are sick, then it's obvious that you got sick, so one expression can be used to mean the other one, but "interchangeable" is too big a word. What exactly are you asking? Just like your other question, it's still not clear what you want
    – gotube
    Sep 29, 2022 at 15:04
  • @gotube thanks for getting back actually according to chime, got' is also interchangeable with 'was' in these constructions (I got sick; I got cold) So i wanted to ask if "get" is also interchangeable with "is/am/are in these construction (He is sick, I am cold, They are confused)(sick,cold,confused are adjective here) but Kate Bunting clearfied my query. Sep 29, 2022 at 15:23
  • @kate bunting If i say "I got in touch with him" could I interpret "got" as in "became" as in "I became in touch with him".could I also interpret "got" as in "i have been or "was" in touch with him? Sep 29, 2022 at 21:58
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    Getting in touch is a deliberate action. You can't 'become' in touch with someone - one or other of you has to make the first move (or a third person might put you in touch with one another. Sep 30, 2022 at 15:30

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"I am sick" and other variations are almost exclusively American English. British people normally say "I am ill" (or other colloquial alternatives such as poorly). In British English, "sick" normally refers to an instance of vomiting, depending on how it is used (eg "I have been sick", or "I was sick").

When you say "cold", are you referring to the common cold, an illness? As this is a noun it is normally used with an article, eg "I have a cold". But if you mean that you became cold due to a drop in temperature, for example, then you can say "I am cold", "I became cold" etc.

Aside from these points, the variations you suggest would be correct.

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  • @Astralbee.Kindly correct me If I am wrong, what i interpreted is that "get" is also interchangeable with "is/am/are in these construction (He is sick, I am cold, They are confused)(where sick,cold,confused are used as adjective here) Sep 29, 2022 at 12:28
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    @BilalZafar "Am" is present tense. "I am sick" means you're sick now. "I got sick" is past-tense, meaning you became sick in the past. "I get sick" would mean that you have a tendency to become sick.
    – Astralbee
    Sep 29, 2022 at 12:33

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