0

This context comes from the video game "Divinity Original Sin II"

"His lascivious eyes flicker over you to skin-crawling effect."

"effect"

  1. something that is produced by a cause or agent; result (source:Collins Dictionary)

Does this mean that his eyes flickered over him with the result that his skin crawled? Is this a normal form of using it? I never heard the phrase "to effect" only "with effect". Do these mean the same thing?

2 Answers 2

1

"His lascivious eyes flicker over you to skin-crawling effect."

Does this mean that his eyes flickered over him you with the result that his your skin crawled?

Yes. Although I would say "His lascivious eyes flicker over you with the effect that your skin crawled."

Is this a normal form of using it?

To [adjective] effect is an adverbial phrase and is standard English, although the adjective is usually (but not always) qualitative:

His only defence against the bear was his knife but he used it to good effect and the bear ran away.

1

Expressions like Something happens with or to adjective effect mean that the event or action at the beginning causes an effect described by the adjective. The text you quoted means '"His lascivious eyes flicker over you and this causes your skin to crawl".

The bomb exploded to/with horrifying effect.

The Prime Minister slipped on a banana skin to/with hilarious effect.

The boy studied his books to good effect.

The fool interfered with the machine to disastrous effect.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .