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That is what I learn from English grammar books

"I wish he wouldn't make noise" means he is making noise or he often makes noise and I don't like that and I wish he changed his behavior.

"I wish he didn't make noise" means he is making noise or he often makes noise and I merely wish he did differently but that sentence doesn't say if I like or don't like his behavior

But I don't know how do native speakers think about these 2 sentences?

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    If you 'wish he did differently', you certainly don't like it! (But it suggests a preference rather than annoyance at the noise.) Oct 1, 2022 at 16:23
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    Very similar, but 'wouldn't' conveys more suggestion of doing it on purpose, whereas 'didn't' suggests he can't help it. If he's humming along to headphones while working at his PC: 'wouldn't', if his shoes squeak while he's walking (normally) along the office corridor: 'didn't'.
    – mcalex
    Oct 1, 2022 at 16:54

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Yes, with "wish...wouldn't", there's a slight nuance of annoyance, whereas "wish...didn't" doesn't have that nuance. So a proficient speaker would prefer "wouldn't" when they're annoyed, and "didn't" when they're not annoyed. To be clear, it isn't a rule of English, just a preference.

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  • +1 As an AmE I agree! :3
    – DialFrost
    Oct 2, 2022 at 1:46

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