0
  1. Who/whom are you talking about?
  1. Bill is a troublesome boy, whom(who?) you are talking about.

In the first sentence, who can substitute for whom. I wonder if who can do the same in the second sentence.

1
  • 1
    2) is not really a sentence. Bill is the troublesome boy you are talking about. The who is not needed.
    – Lambie
    Oct 9, 2022 at 17:23

1 Answer 1

0

We can use the relative pronoun whom or who when it is the object of the verb.

Bill is the troublesome boy whom/who you are talking about.

In a restrictive relative clause we can leave out the relative pronoun when it is the object of the verb.

Bill is the troublesome boy whom/who you are talking about.➜ Bill is the troublesome boy you are talking about.

We use non-restrictive relative clauses to give extra information about the person or thing. It is not necessary information. We use commas in non-restrictive relative clauses.

In a non-restrictive relative clause, the relative pronoun cannot be left out.

Bill, whom/who you are talking about, is a troublesome boy.

We cannot use 'Bill, you are talking about, is a troublesome boy'.

(Edited)

1
  • It's not a proper sentence. Bill is the troublesome boy (who) you are talking about.
    – Lambie
    Oct 9, 2022 at 17:33

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .