1

An example from wordreference.com:
(1) I'm working days this week and nights next week.

I'm interested in using the word "days" here:
firstly it means one of the parts which a 24-hour period is divided into;
secondly it answers the question "when", being used without any preposition:
-When are you working this week and when next week?
-I'm working days this week and nights next week.

To better understand such a usage, I decided to make up some similar variants of (1).
(2) I'm working day this week and night next week. — is it correct?
(3) I'm working day tomorrow and night the day after tomorrow. — is it correct?

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  • Days, as it's used in your example, refers to a work-shift or just shift (i.e. The part of the 24 hour period a worker is expected to be at work). These work-shifts do no necessarily match the daylight definitions of days and nights. A day shift might be from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. and a night shift may run from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. Shifts are also often called first, second, and third shift.
    – EllieK
    Commented Oct 13, 2022 at 12:28

1 Answer 1

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The thread on Word Reference was started by a question about shift working. I'm working days this week means This week, I will be working the day shift.

People who work night shifts usually do so for a period of time so that they can establish a pattern of sleeping in the daytime. Someone who had to work a single night shift in an emergency would probably say "I have to work a night shift tomorrow", not "I'm working night".

So - no, it isn't natural to say "I'm working day" or "I'm working night" in the singular.

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  • Can I use "days" without attaching it to work-shifts? For example we have the next sentence (-link-): People who work night shift and sleep days often want totally opaque blackout curtains for their bedroom windows to keep the room dark while they sleep. Can I say it without "working night shift": "People who sleep days often want totally opaque blackout curtains for their bedroom windows." ? Thanks.
    – Loviii
    Commented Oct 13, 2022 at 14:40

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