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I have come across these two pages: p1 p2.

Whey discuss about the structure : "as ... than".

They are talking about the following sentences:

1 Test conducted on babies reveal that baby girls respond almost twice as much to a loud sound than do boys.

2 Tests conducted on babies reveal that baby girls respond twice more often to a loud sound than do baby boys.

3 Tests conducted on babies reveal that baby girls respond twice more often to a loud sound than baby boys do.

There are some contradictory opinions on these pages and I got confused.

Also in this page it has been written:

4 Men were twice as likely to be arrested for drink driving than women, at 26% and 14% respectively.

Which ones of these sentences are correct? When can I use the structure "as ... than"? Can I totally forget about "as ... than" and always use "as ... as" which seems a safer choice? For example, can we readily substitute "than" with "as" in the above sentences?

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There is no structure in English, "as...than". It doesn't exist. So yes, you can forget about it.

Possible structures are "as...as" and "[comparative]...than".

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  • "Twice more often" jars as well. (1) Twice as much...as (2) and (3) Twice as often...as OR more often ...than (4) Twice as likely... as. Oct 17, 2022 at 15:39

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