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In the sentence "Once you finish one interview, you are able to schedule your next one for two weeks out."

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  • in one or two weeks from now. But this question should be on ELL.
    – Lambie
    Oct 19, 2022 at 21:41
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    There isn't such a thing as "a slang" because it is not a count noun. And that's just Urban Dictionary silliness: you shouldn't pay it any attention.
    – tchrist
    Oct 19, 2022 at 23:57
  • Urban Dictionary is not a reliable source because anybody can add an entry, and most are simply nonsense. Also note that most slang in English is generally very dialect/region specific, so you should use it for international communications. It's certainly not standard English. You probably shouldn't use it. Better to say "two weeks from now" or "two weeks later" or "in two weeks time".
    – Billy Kerr
    Jul 30, 2023 at 12:22

2 Answers 2

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This seems to be a strange use of "out" as an adverb. In nautical terms, we have "We left Boston on the sailing ship on the 21st. When we were three days out, the captain told us of a change in plan."

Here, out has the general meaning of "away from the starting point" (i.e. Boston)

"Once you finish one interview, you are able to schedule your next one for two weeks out."

In the example, the next interview is two weeks from the starting point - which is the last interview.

This use of "out" sounds strange in British English.

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It means that, once you finish one interview, you can schedule the next interview for about two weeks from then.

You can't schedule the next one until you've completed the first one. The two weeks out is based on when you finished the first one.

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