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You can not "be" angry while listening to "someone whom you are disagree with".

You can not "get" angry while listening to "someone you disagree with".

People "be" angry or "get" angry? And "someone whom you are disagree with" here using "whom" is preferable? or "someone you disagree with" is proper choice?

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be angry

is a continuing state, while

get angry

is more likely a current situation that transforms you from being OK to being angry. Whether you get angry depends on how the situation progresses.

As for:

someone whom you are disagree with

you cannot say are disagree (needs -ing), but the best way to say this would be:

someone with whom you disagree

though someone you disagree with is also OK.

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  1. Both "be angry" and "get angry" are valid English constructs, and can have different meanings depending on the context.
  2. "someone whom you are disagree with" is wrong. Your second choice-"someone you disagree with" is the correct one.

Coming back to your first question:

You can not "be" angry while listening to [...]

This sentence implies that you should not already be angry while listening to someone you disagree with. It's sort of a continuation of your anger from a previous instance, if you will.

You can not "get" angry while listening to [...]

This says that you should not "get" angry when listening to someone you disagree with. Here, your anger is implied to arise out of the conversation you have with someone, and not as a previous continuation.

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