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I think that both are correct, but what's the difference?

It hasn't happened yet. It's all in the future.

Before you find out what happened I'll have known about it for a few hours.

Before you find out what has happened I'll have known about it for a few hours.

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The second implies that the 'happening' was very recent, or is expected to happen soon. British English speakers use the present perfect in this way more often than Americans.

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  • But it hasn't happened. It's all in the future.
    – user1425
    Commented Oct 26, 2022 at 7:46
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    Both sentences could be understood to refer to a past incident that neither person knows the details of yet, or something that is expected to happen in the near future. Commented Oct 26, 2022 at 7:52

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