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Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise.

-- Margaret Atwood

Why can "else" introduce a none phrase (my age), what part of speech is it? Oxford Learner's Dictionaries doesn't seem to allow such grammar.

Or is the phrase a shortened form "everyone else at my age"? Then why "at" can be omitted?

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    It's short for everyone else who is [of] my age. Oct 31 at 7:52
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    It's an example fof whiz-deletion english.stackexchange.com/tags/whiz-deletion/….
    – JavaLatte
    Oct 31 at 7:59
  • @JavaLatte whiz-deletion only deletes who is, but why is "of" also deleted?
    – Gqqnbig
    Nov 1 at 7:23
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    As @KateBunting indicated, [of] is optional in the sentence. If you were to include it, the whiz-deleted form would be "... everyone else of my age".
    – JavaLatte
    Nov 1 at 7:47
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    According to the [Cambridge Dictionary] [dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/of], the meaning of of in this kind of sentence is "that is/are", so it is it is an alternative to whiz-deletion. So you can say "Somebody who is my age" which can be whiz-deleted to "somebody my age" or you can say "somebody of my age". In the last one, of is syntactically a preposition and semantically "that is". You probably can say "somebody who is of my age" but it is unnecessary.
    – JavaLatte
    Nov 3 at 7:53

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