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I wanted to say that the participle clauses are the most challenging grammar topic for me. On the one hand, my mind tells me to use "is" because "grammar topic" is singular, but on the other hand, I use the plural noun, so I need to use the plural verb.

I am confused by this sentence and looking for help. How can I express this idea? Which sentence is the correct one, if any? And why?

#1 Participle clauses is the most challenging grammar topic for me.

#2: Participle clauses are the most challenging grammar topic for me.


Edited:

Can I use the plural subject and the singular object? Or maybe, do I need to change the object to plural?

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    A finite verb should agree with its subject. Can you identify the subject in this sentence? Commented Nov 5, 2022 at 5:46
  • The subject is "participle clauses", so I need to use "are" to be consistent. Can I use the plural subject and the singular object? Commented Nov 8, 2022 at 12:24
  • Yes, there is no prohibition against using a plural subject with a singular object. (However, in this sentence "the most challenging grammar topic for me" would more commonly be considered a predicative nominal). Commented Nov 8, 2022 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

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A participle clause is the...

A participle clause is the...

Participle clauses are the...

We cannot say 'participle clauses is'. 'Participle clauses' is plural. So 'are' should be used.

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  • What about the object "topic"? Do I need to change it to plural? That part confuses me. Commented Nov 8, 2022 at 12:30
  • I don't think you need to make it plural. Commented Nov 8, 2022 at 12:34

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