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An interest group gives to a candidate who is a firm believer in the group's cause to try to push the candidate over the top to victory, thereby avoiding the need for much direct lobbying.

I am confused about a candidate who is a firm believer in the group's cause or a candidate who is a firm believer in the group's cause to try to push the candidate over the top to victory.

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    The sentence makes no sense. I suspect there is an omitted word, or else it has been altered without checking what collateral changes are needed. The simplist emendation would be to insert a noun phrase (eg a means) before "to try"; but that would make the subject of the infinitive clause the candidate, which doesn't make sense.
    – Colin Fine
    Nov 8, 2022 at 18:42
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    @ColinFine Makes sense to me. Try parsing "to try to push" as "in order to try to push".
    – gotube
    Nov 8, 2022 at 21:16
  • @gotube: then what are they giving?
    – Colin Fine
    Nov 9, 2022 at 11:31
  • @ColinFine "gives" is intransitive here, and the implied gift is probably money because that's what people give to candidates they wish to support. Replace "gives" with "makes donations" to make it more obvious.
    – gotube
    Nov 9, 2022 at 17:26
  • OK. Now you've explained it, I can just make it work. But by god, it's hard to parsse.
    – Colin Fine
    Nov 9, 2022 at 17:43

1 Answer 1

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A group of people with an interest in a political cause
gives (presumably) money to a candidate for an election.
This candidate is someone who supports the group's cause.
The group hopes that this financial support will enable the candidate to win the election.
It also hopes that with this support, it will not be necessary to try to promote the candidate in other ways.

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  • You may be rght in your interpretation of the intent, but it still doesn't make sense. It wouldf need to say what they are giving the candidate: giving him "to try to push" is a nonsense.
    – Colin Fine
    Nov 8, 2022 at 18:44
  • @ColinFine I can only think that money (or equivalent) has somehow been omitted. Nov 8, 2022 at 18:46
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    I agree with everything, except in the last sentence I'd say "it will not be necessary to try to promote the cause in other ways". The "direct lobbying" they're trying to avoid in the original sentence is lobbying for the cause, not for that candidate.
    – gotube
    Nov 8, 2022 at 21:19

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