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wordreference.com:

I say: Paddington Station is three stops ahead.
You ask: What is the next stop?
It means: What is the first stop we will come to (which is two stops before Paddington Station).

I say: Paddington Station is three stops ahead.
You ask: What is the following stop?
It means: What is the next stop after Paddington Station? = What is the fourth stop (the stop after Paddington Station)?

I want to find out if the text above is the way all native speakers perceive it or just a private opinion.

For example, John and Bill are at the stop A. The order of the stops is A, B, C, D, E, ...

(1):
John: D is three stops ahead.
Bill: What is the next stop?
The correct answer is B.
Do you agree with this?

(2):
John: D is three stops ahead.
Bill: What is the following stop?
The correct answer is E.
Do you agree with this?

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    There is no correct answer. In that context, the meaning is ambiguous. The speaker might be referring to the stop coming up or to the stop after Paddington. There is no way of telling. The same difficulty arises with days. On Monday the 1st, next Saturday falls the 6th. But on Thursday the 4th, next Saturday could be either on the 6th or the 13th. There is a grey area between this Saturday and next Saturday. And the same is true of your examples. To be clear, you have to specify. Commented Nov 9, 2022 at 19:59
  • The next stop after Paddington might be none at all, as GWR trains terminate there, or Bond Street, Acton Main Line, Edgware Road, Warwick Avenue, Royal Oak, or Bayswater, depending on the Transport for London underground line. Commented Nov 9, 2022 at 20:21
  • The example that you quoted, which seems to be what a user posted on a grammar forum, is incorrect. "Next" could mean the station after Paddington (i.e., the fourth station ahead). Commented Nov 9, 2022 at 20:24
  • As a native speaker, if I wanted to know what stop follows Paddington, I would ask "What's after that?" Commented Nov 9, 2022 at 20:27
  • Perceive what exactly? What is the following stop?= What is the next stop?
    – Lambie
    Commented Nov 9, 2022 at 20:49

2 Answers 2

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You will often run into sentences that are ambiguous. Sometimes sentences are not ambiguous if everyone followed the rules of the English language 100%, but people don't. Including native English speakers. Sometimes especially native English speakers. They will not all answer the same.

It's best to avoid ambiguities in the first place. You could ask "What is the next stop from here?" and "What is the next stop after that?".

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  • You said: "What is the next stop from here?" is correct. --- "What is the next stop after that?" is correct. --- Tell me please: Is "What is the following stop from here?" correct? --- Is "What is the following stop after that?" correct? Thanks.
    – Loviii
    Commented Dec 30, 2022 at 1:11
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This is a map so people can get their bearings. I have made this a WIKI. Please feel free to write in this answer box.

Split My Fare (London Paddington)

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