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Is this sentence correct: Please tell me when you get here.

Some teachers said the sentence should be like "Please tell me when you got here" or "Please tell me when you will get here," implying the time you got here or at what time in the future you will get here.

I am wondering if the word "when" here means "while," will this sentence be correct? Or should I change it into "Please call or text me when you get here?"

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    Both the sentences which you allege some teachers say it should be are more dubious than the sentence. I can find nothing wrong with it. Without additional context, it's hard to gauge whether "call or text" is better than "tell"; if it's an instruction for a visitor to let you know when they arrived while you are not there, I guess it's slightly clearer with "call or text".
    – tripleee
    Commented Nov 10, 2022 at 18:34

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All of the sentences are grammatically correct, but mean different things. None of them is "more correct" than any other, you would just use them in different situations.

Please tell me when you get here means "Notify me at the moment that you arrive." For example, if I arrive at the office, I will call and say "I have arrived!"

Please tell me when you got here means "Tell me the time at which you arrived (in the past)." I might answer "I got here at 2:30 PM."

Please tell me when you will get here means "Tell me the time at which you plan to arrive (in the future)." I might answer "I will get there at 6 PM."

When does not really mean while in any of these contexts. It means something like "the exact time that".

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The sentences are correct. But they have different meanings.

When a question is part of a long sentence, it loses its normal question word order. When do you get here? Please tell me when you get here.

When did you get here? Please tell me when you got here.

When will you get here? Please tell me when you will get here.

In these situations we do not usually use 'while' instead of 'when'.

[ I will phone him when you get here. 'when you get here' refers to the future. We cannot use 'will' in the when-part. We cannot say '...when you will get here'. ]

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