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Would you please tell me if there is any difference between take a job and take on a job in the context below?

You laptop looks too damaged to be fixed, but let me ask if there is someone who would take the job.

You laptop looks too damaged to be fixed, but let me ask if there is someone who would take on the job.

Are both perfectly natural in the context?

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To "take a job" usually means to accept an offer of employment or accept a contract to do a piece of paid work.

In the context with the laptop, the person speaking might be an agent who connects professional computer repair people to customers with broken computers. The "job" means the contract to complete the repair work. The agent is offering to try and find someone who will accept the contract.

To "take something on" is a phrasal verb that roughly means to begin some task where success is not assured. It does not imply employment or contract work.

So in the context with the laptop, the person speaking might work in a company's IT department, and they're offering to ask if any of their tech support people would be willing to try and fix it. In this case, the "job" is the work itself, nothing to do with employment.

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There is a subtle difference in natural usage in that 'take the job' is neutral, but 'take on the job' implies or acknowledges some sort of hardship or difficulty.

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