3

I have had a disagreement with a teacher over the correct structure of a sentence.

My teacher said that the sentence "...and if they agree terms, they will have a deal." is correct. However, this sounds incorrect to me.

I would always say "...and if they agree to the terms, they will have a deal."

Could someone please tell me which is correct?

1
  • I'll bet you a beer that your teacher is British or learned English from a British background. See my answer below.
    – Drew
    Commented Sep 6, 2014 at 3:23

3 Answers 3

2

This is British English versus American English. Brits sometimes say we agree the terms. Yanks typically say we agree to the terms. Take your pick.

Here is one comparison.

1

I'm from the UK, and I prefer "If they agree to/on the terms, they will have a deal". Having said that, I wouldn't bat an eyelid if I saw or or heard "If they agree terms, they will have a deal". It's not a question of which is correct, as both forms are acceptable.

-2

You are correct. Agree is an intransitive verb. Therefore, you cannot "agree terms"; you need to say, "agree to terms".

3
  • 2
    Also, "agree to the terms" would suggest that there is a specific already-existing set of terms that they may agree to, as opposed to them negotiating to come up with terms, although I suppose it could be interpreted as "the terms of their deal".
    – user10092
    Commented Sep 5, 2014 at 8:19
  • @RickyDemer, in which case, as an American, I would say "agree to terms".
    – The Photon
    Commented Sep 6, 2014 at 22:43
  • 2
    "You are correct. Agree is an intransitive verb." This is simply wrong. To agree is ambitransitive, i.e. it can be transitive or intransitive.
    – user81561
    Commented Sep 3, 2021 at 10:56

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .