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I made bold to call at the sweetmeat shop, where Mrs. Madehurst met me with a fat woman’s hospitable tears. Jenny’s child, she said, had died two days after the nun had come. It was, she felt, best out of the way, even though insurance offices, for reasons which she did not pretend to follow, would not willingly insure such stray lives. “Not but what Jenny didn’t tend to Arthur as though he’d come all proper at de end of de first year—like Jenny herself.” Thanks to Miss Florence, the child had been buried with a pomp which, in Mrs. Madehurst’s opinion, more than covered the small irregularity of its birth. She described the coffin, within and without, the glass hearse, and the evergreen lining of the grave.

This is from "They" by Rudyard Kipling.
https://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/tale/they.htm

I don't understand the meaning of
“Not but what Jenny didn’t tend to Arthur as though he’d come all proper at de end of de first year—like Jenny herself.”

I am glad if someone would kindly teach me.

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This is a reference to

the small irregularity of its birth

and earlier in the story

“Dat sort,” she wailed—“dey’re just as much to us dat has ’em as if dey was lawful born

The child was illegitimate. Nevertheless, Jenny was a good mother, not humiliated by her son and wishing he were dead -- whether from the damage to her reputation or the expense of keeping him. (Hence the reluctance of insurance companies: they knew that such children were likely to die of neglect or even murder.)

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