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How can I describe one person who is better than someone else at doing something?

I'm talking about difference in skill level, I guess. For example, two people do the same activity, but not necessary at the same time.

I don't know in English but in my native language, beat someone at doing something is a way of saying "much much better at that than someone".

Please give me some examples with different verbs.

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    As it stands, this is far too broad to be answered. Could you edit your question to tell us more about what kind of expressions you're looking for, and what activities you're talking about? – StoneyB Sep 6 '14 at 23:25
  • I agree that some more context would be helpful. Is beat meant to refer to winning in, say, a game of chess, or a game of tennis? Moreover, the word "beat" can also mean "arrive somewhere first," as in: Joey took the bus home, Peter rode his bike, but Peter beat Joey to the house. I'm assuming you mean in some kind of athletic competition, but it's hard to tell for sure. I'm putting the question on hold, but will gladly reopen it once more information is provided. – J.R. Sep 6 '14 at 23:59
  • I can help, once I understand what you are asking. "I am better than someone at something" isn't quite the same as "I beat someone at something". Are you talking about a difference in skill level, or the outcome of one event? And do you mean games of skill, like basketball or wrestling? – J.R. Sep 7 '14 at 0:33
  • difference in skill level I guess. For example : I and a person were doing the same activity, not necessary at the same time. I don't know in English but in my native language, beat someone at doing something is a way of saying "much much better at that than someone". – quintana43 Sep 7 '14 at 0:47
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    In typical informal conversation you might hear, "Wow, you're way better than I am." And I tend to slur better than to better'n – Jim Sep 7 '14 at 1:32
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One way to say this is to use the word skill, or the expression more skilled, much like you did in your question:

Jeff always beats me in golf. He is far more skilled than I am.

Playing checkers with my 9-year-old can be boring. She just doesn't have enough skill yet to play competitively yet.

The Oakdale high school team couldn't compete against the Olympic volleyball team; the skill level of their opponents would simply be way too high.

Macmillan defines the word skill as:

the ability to do something well, usually as a result of experience and training

You can also convey this sentiment with the expression can't compete:

I couldn't compete against against Brianna Stewart. She's about 6 inches taller than I am, and one of the best athletes in college sports.

My son tries to play chess with me, but he just can't compete.

We could play darts for money if you wanted to, but, I'm telling you, you won't be able to compete. I used to play in weekly tournaments for about ten years.

We finally had to close down our burger restaurant. We just couldn't compete against the McDonald's across the street.

When compete is negated in the sentence, it often implies a gross mismatch like the one you describe in your question.

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