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"Prepared as he was for many shocks, Professor Gaitonde had not expected this".

I have seen sentences with similar form before too, which begin with an adjective followed by "as+he/she/it/they/we/I/you+primary verb,which is followed the other part of the sentence separated by a comma. So, what kind of sentence structure do these belong to ?

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    It conveys "Even though he was prepared for many shocks..." Commented Dec 16, 2022 at 15:18
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    "Prepared as he was for many shocks" is best analysed as a type of concessive adjunct. Note that "as" could be replaced by the concessive adverb "though"
    – BillJ
    Commented Dec 16, 2022 at 17:10

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'Prepared' is an adjective. 'Prepared for many shocks' would be an adjective phrase describing Professor Gaitonde.

The clause 'as he was' is an adverbial clause modifying the adjective within the adjective phrase.

I'm not aware of a name for this particular kind of sentence structure, it's just a different way of phrasing what could be written as:

Professor Gaitonde had not expected this, even though he was prepared for many shocks.

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  • A preferable analysis is one where the adjective "prepared" is a preposed complement in the preposition phrase "prepared as he was for many shocks" = "as he was prepared for many shocks".
    – BillJ
    Commented Dec 16, 2022 at 18:39

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