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a. Whichever student hands in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize.

b. Whichever students hand in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize.

c. Whichever of you hands in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize.

d. Whichever one of you hands in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize.

e. Whichever ones of you hand in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize.

f. Whoever of you hands in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize.

Which could be used instead of

Those students/those of you who hand in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize.

In other words which have or could have a plural meaning?

1 Answer 1

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A. and d. obviously mean 'one student', which doesn't make sense unless you change it to Whichever student hands in their homework first. C. and f. imply 'one' because of the singular verb 'hands'.

That leaves b. and e. as definitely referring to more than one student.

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