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Let's assume I'm on the 1st floor, but in order to go by the lift to the 5th floor, you have 2 ways: 1. To use a chip that unlocks the lift (like hotel cards). 2. ask a person (for instance, a secretary) on the 5th floor, to press the button for you.

Now, if I want to ask the person to do it for me on the 5th floor, I can just ask him simply: "Can you press the button for me?" But I'm looking for an idiomatic option. I've found myself recently saying: "Can you CALL the lift?", but I'm not sure if it's idiomatic. Is it?

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    Yes. In the UK you sometimes see buttons to press with a label saying 'CALL LIFT' or 'SUMMON LIFT'. Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 9:25
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    "call the lift" means "get the lift here", it's not clear if you mean that or if you want the lift sent to a floor you're not currently on.
    – Stuart F
    Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 10:47
  • You push a button to call a lift or elevator. It is the only way to say it.
    – Lambie
    Commented Dec 23, 2022 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

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In my experience of lifts (elevators) in the UK and Europe, you press a button on your own floor to call the lift to you.

If for some reason the system involved asking someone on another floor to operate the controls, I would say "Can you send the lift to the first floor, please?"

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I think you can use "Can the lift come to this floor/level?".

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