1

Let's assume today is 12/26. In reported speeches, we have to change time references

On 12/25, he said he would go to the class in 12/27.

Example 1

Me: He told me yesterday that he would go to the class two days later.

Example 2

Me: He told me yesterday that he would go to the class tomorrow.

Example 3

On 12/25, he said he would go to the class on 12/27.

Are all three of them correct?

3
  • (1) sounds very unnatural when the date referred to hasn't come yet. Dec 26, 2022 at 10:21
  • According to what were taught at grammar lessons: 1) He told me yesterday that he would go to the class in 2 day's time. 2) He told me yesterday that he would go to the class the following day.
    – Yunus
    Jun 30, 2023 at 21:53
  • dates use on, not in.
    – Lambie
    Nov 28, 2023 at 14:53

2 Answers 2

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I believe examples 2 and 3 are correct but 1 isn't.

Example 1 mentions "two days later" which doesn't suit this context. Instead of "two days later", you should use "skip" with "for two days" instead, like:

He told me yesterday that he would skip the class for two days.

That would be clear for everybody that you're mentioning the day after today.

Other examples 2 and 3 are also proper; therefore, they don't need to be modified.

0

Example 3 is clearly correct.

Example 1 is probably correct, but not a usual construction. A more likely version would be, "He told me he would go to the class in two days."

Example 2 is ambiguous, and should not be used. The problem is that "tomorrow" is a relative term, and the reference frame is not fixed. It could mean that he said "I will go to the class tomorrow", in which case "tomorrow" refers to the date of the present statement. It can also mean the same as Example 3. In a verbal conversation, a direct quote would be indicated by tone of voice which is not included in a written account.

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