1

"One of the reasons this was mysterious to me was that the wrong answers would typically be ones that I'd expect a person with no particular expertise in the area to realize are wrong if they spent less than a minute thinking about it"

Is this sentence grammatically correct? Could I interpret as

" One of the reasons this was mysterious to me was that the wrong answers would typically be ones that I'd expect a person with no particular expertise in the area to realize [that the answers] are wrong if they spent less than a minute thinking about it?

As an English learner, I have encountered quite a number of sentences that omit subjects/omit verb in their associated clauses.(other examples:Grammar involving than omission of subject after "than") How to determine if it is grammatically correct to do so? thx

1
  • It's a phenomenon called ellipsis, and yes it is common in English, and yes the sentence is grammatical. Unfortunately it can lead to rather long rambling sentences which are difficult for learners to parse. Read more here: Ellipsis: Definition and Examples in Grammar
    – Billy Kerr
    May 26, 2023 at 10:55

1 Answer 1

0

"One of the reasons this was mysterious to me was that the wrong answers would typically be ones that I'd expect a person with no particular expertise in the area to realize are wrong if they spent less than a minute thinking about it"

The above sentence is correct. You don't have any periods or commas in this sentence; thus, there is no need for repetition of "the answers".

You must log in to answer this question.