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I read http://www.dailywritingtips.com/careful-with-words-used-as-noun-and-verb/ and http://www.businessenglishresources.com/31-2/teachers-section/mini-lessons/pronunciation-lessons-pronunciation-changes-in-words-that-are-both-nouns-and-verbs/

  1. How do you pronounce the noun correlate? How do you determine this? Is it like the noun isolate?

  2. What's this phenomenon called? Are there any general lessons to be learned here? Is it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Initial-stress-derived_noun?

  3. Are there any exceptions?

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  • As to the "how" the link you consulted gives the sound and IPA transcription. As for the rest of the question -ate is one of the tricky suffixes. For a start could this two pages from pronuncian.com be of help? 1 2
    – None
    Sep 8, 2014 at 16:04

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How do you pronounce the noun correlate? How do you determine this? Is it like the noun isolate?

Yes, there's an entire family of words like this: increase, record, rebel, survey, and so on.

Generally speaking, when you have a word that can be both a verb and a noun and it's polysyllabic, it tends to have an unstressed final syllable in the noun form, and tends to have a stressed final syllable in the verb form. So the verbs would be

  • "re · cord", "re · bel", "sur · vey", and so on,

while the nouns would be

  • "re · cord", "re · bel", "sur · vey", and so on.

What's this phenomenon called? Are there any general lessons to be learned here? Is it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Initial-stress-derived_noun?

That's the one!

Are there any exceptions?

English is, as you probably know, rife with exceptions to every rule. For example, these would be pronounced identically:

That book is a great read.

She reads the book.

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