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How should I interpret the 'as' in this sentence? Also, is the word 'them' referring to 'foundation' or 'movies?'

In the process, they upended decades of established technique for how to make an effect-heavy movie and created the foundation for movies as we understand them today.

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  • I made some edits; please make sure that they're OK. (I assume that "toady" should have been "today".) Jan 8, 2023 at 19:13
  • I explained this in my answer.
    – Lambie
    May 24, 2023 at 17:36
  • What is the question in regards to "as"? What specifically don't you understand about it? Jun 15, 2023 at 4:21

2 Answers 2

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The "them" refers to the movies, because "them" cannot be used with singular objects (only singular people). Foundation is a singular object.

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    "Movies as we understand them today" refers to the kind of films we regard as normal and usual today (effect-heavy = with lots of special effects). Jan 9, 2023 at 9:36
  • Thanks. I am still confused about the meaning. How do we understand the movies today? Can you express the sentence in a straightforward way? Jan 11, 2023 at 3:42
  • The sentence means "movies of today, as opposed to movies of the 1900s".
    – ILEM World
    Jan 11, 2023 at 15:01
  • Thanks, i think i understand it now. Jan 18, 2023 at 15:55
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as: in the way that we understand them today

It's just that.

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  • Believe me: as we understand them today means what I said. Nothing else. Please disregard the dv.
    – Lambie
    May 24, 2023 at 17:36
  • Lambie, learners of English can't understand this simplicity. It's not like "It's just that", they need you to explicate it! Jun 4, 2023 at 11:13
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    @SovereignSun Look at what Kate Bunting said above to explain it.
    – Lambie
    Jun 4, 2023 at 14:50
  • @SovereignSun What Lambie gives here is pretty much the dictionary definition of "as" in this context. What's wrong with it?
    – gotube
    Jun 23, 2023 at 18:04
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    @SovereignSun Some things are just simple.
    – Lambie
    Jun 26, 2023 at 15:30

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