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When I read this document using-native-node-modules:

npm install --save-dev electron-rebuild

# Every time you run "npm install", run this:
./node_modules/.bin/electron-rebuild

# If you have trouble on Windows, try:
.\node_modules\.bin\electron-rebuild.cmd

this sentence Every time you run "npm install", run this:, why it don't say:

Every time after you run "npm install", run this:

Every time you run "npm install", then run this:`
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  • Nothing is wrong with your versions, except that “After every time” would be more natural. Commented Jan 18, 2023 at 6:18
  • so, the documentation describe inaccurate, right? Commented Jan 18, 2023 at 7:19
  • A sentence can be phrased in many ways equally accurate (as I illustrated by approving both of yours). The documentation may be unclear, but I cannot say it is inaccurate. Commented Jan 18, 2023 at 18:45

1 Answer 1

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I don't know enough about the programming elements, so I may be wrong in what follows. But I don't see anything wrong with the instructions. This is what it seems to be saying to me:

Code:

# Every time you run "npm install", run this:
./node_modules/.bin/electron-rebuild

Interpretation

Each time you run "npm install", you should also run the /node_modules app. The file may be run first, at the same time or after. The relative timing of the two files is not mentioned. It's simply saying that both files need to be run as a package.

If I'm right, you don't need to add then. Note that the word then has different possible meanings here:

  1. It may be a timing marker. "Run program 1, then program 2" tells us what order to run the two programs.
  2. It may be a conditional marker ("If...then"). "Every time you run program 1, then run program 2" is not telling us which program goes first. It's telling us that if we run program 1, then we also need to run program 2.

So when you list your proposed options (Every time after you run npm installl..."), you are turning the instruction into a timing marker. This may be right, but it certainly doesn't have to be.

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