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that is the HeadLine I came across from New York Times:

Google Calls In Help From Larry Page and Sergey Brin for A.I. Fight

is it correct call in "help"? I mean should the "help" word go between calls in and Larry Page and Sergey Brin?

I thought the correct way would be:

calls in Larry Page and Sergey Brin for help

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    The headline is OK. Google calls in help. Who from? From Larry Page and Sergey Brin. Jan 20, 2023 at 13:55
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    Agreed. Help = assistance. Google is requesting assistance.
    – stangdon
    Jan 20, 2023 at 14:55

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The alternate sentence:

Google calls in Larry Page and Sergey Brin for help

would be valid. But the phrase "calls in help", meaning "asks for assistance", is a very common one, perhaps even a fixed phrase. Thus in a headline, where brevity and familiarity are at a premium, it is likely to be used.

Certainly the sentence:

Google calls in Help from Larry Page and Sergey Brin for A.I. fight.

is perfectly valid, and quite natural. The word "help" can be and often is used to mean "assistance" in general.

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    And there is also the expression to call in the cavalry, which means to request assistance (from an unspecified but often implicitly understood source). Oct 27, 2023 at 12:03

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