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I want you to stand up when you hear your name.

I want you to be stood up when you hear your name.

Which one of these is correct?

Are both these sentences correct?

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    To be stood up means that you agreed to meet someone at a specific time and place, but they decided not to come. It's only to be wished on your enemies :) Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 17:38
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    "stand someone up": to break a date by not showing up. source
    – Levente
    Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 18:47
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    Due to the semantics invoked by the idiom inside it, the sentence "I want you to be stood up when you hear your name" does not make sense whatsoever.
    – Levente
    Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 18:51

1 Answer 1

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I want you to...

stand up : This means that you want the listener to go to a standing position. This is almost certainly what you mean.

be stood up : This means that you want someone else to put the listener in a standing position. This is very strange and probably not what you mean. (Or it could mean "I want someone else to make an appointment with you but not show up." That seems even less likely.)

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    More efficiently put: only the first sentence is correct. The second one is unusable. See the comments on the question.
    – Levente
    Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 18:55
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    Possibly a distraction, but people from some parts of Bristol would understand 'I want you to to be stood up' perfectly. Being logical, they would, however, ask 'How can I be stood up when you call my name? I can't predict the future'. Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 20:17
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    The same Bristolians would say 'I am sat down', and more perplexingly to outsiders, 'I was laid down' ('laid' pronounced like 'led'). Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 20:18
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    Also in Yorkshire: I was stood there for two hours while you came. (can you spot the other Yorkshirism in that?)
    – Colin Fine
    Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 20:26
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    @ColinFine - In my hippy days around 1973-5 I had a pal who came from Doncaster. he used 'while' like that. I felt so guilty because I fancied his girlfriend, a lot. A real peace-and-love couple, I thought. How base I was. Fast forward ten years. I ran into her and over beers told her how I had felt before. 'I wish you'd bloody told me!' she said, 'I could have ditched that dweeb!'. Somehow this left me with mixed feelings. Commented Jan 22, 2023 at 22:45

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