0

I want to say:

I used to think that if one script changed, only its containing assembly is recompiled.
I used to think he was from France.

But I feel "think" is not proper, native speaker may use other word.

5
  • 1
    "Used to think" is fine. Why do you think it's wrong? Are you from a country whose language splits the meaning of "think" into "believe" (eg Frence penser, croire) or "ponder" ("réfléchir", "contempler") In your examples, "think" means "believe".
    – James K
    Commented Jan 29, 2023 at 8:48
  • 1
    It sounds fine to me. I wouldn't use "is" in the second half though. I'd say "I used to think he was from France." Commented Jan 29, 2023 at 10:49
  • @JamesK, yeah, you get it. I want to mean "believe" here. I'm from China, our language do distinguish the meaning of "think" and "believe". Commented Jan 30, 2023 at 5:26
  • In fact, I want a word softer than "believe", something like "hold the opinion". In Chinese, "believe" may mean "believe a lot", I think which is too much. I used to think "think" does not have the meaning of "believe", so I want a word better than "think" and softer than believe. Now I know "think" is fine. Commented Jan 30, 2023 at 5:29
  • @BeginTheBeguine Thanks, I made the modification. Commented Jan 30, 2023 at 5:31

1 Answer 1

1

Many (Most?) languages have different words for "believe/hold an opinion" and "ponder/intellectually process". However the English word "think" can mean both.

I thought about the maths problem. (intellectually process)

I thought she was pretty. (hold an opinion)

Your examples are natural with "think". It means "hold an opinion" in the examples that you give.

I used to think he was from France.

I used to believe he was from France.

I used to hold the opinion that he was from France.

The last one is the least natural, but all mean the same. Notice the "backshifting" from "is" to "was from France". That is optional but natural.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .