0

I've got the below question from one of my colleagues from the States.

The question is for A's executives sitting on a board of a foreign subsidiary (B) of A, are there supervisory expectations or regulations that set forth any requirements for that board member to raise any issues to the parent(A). APAC Compliance asked what requirements there are for A's executives sitting on the board of APAC subsidiaries (B) to raise issues learned as a board member to the head office (A).

When I saw this question at first, I thought he would like to know what is necessary for A's executives to raise issues of B to A, such as some specific qualification, eligibility or conditions. However, it seems that he would like to know whether A's executives has any obligations (ex. duty to report under the Corporate Law) to raise issues of B to A and if so, what kind of regulations obligate A's executives to do so. From my understanding, "requirement" is a thing that is needed or compulsory. But, in the above usage, the word seems to be used just to substitute for "to require/demand". I mean, to restate what he wanted to say in other words,

The question is for A's executives sitting on a board of a foreign subsidiary of A, are there supervisory expectations or regulations that set forth to require/demand that board member to raise any issues to the parent. APAC Compliance asked what requires/demands A's executives sitting on the board of APAC subsidiaries to raise issues learned as a board member to the head office.

It's a subtle difference, but I'm a little bit confused because the overall meaning of the question could be totally different because the problem here is anything but specific qualification, eligibility or conditions.

Could you please give me a clear explanation for the usage of this word?

18
  • 1
    You haven't provided a link to the source, but it's obviously written by a non-native Anglophone, so I don't see much point in us trying to analyse it. Jan 29, 2023 at 12:29
  • 2
    I’m voting to close this question because it's asking us to interpret text written by a non-native speaker Jan 29, 2023 at 12:29
  • 1
    This is getting worse! You admit to having edited the original (which inevitably involves you parsing and interpreting the text), then you ask us to interpret your text! Presumably your colleague's request came to you as text rather than speech. So please give us the exact text (by Cut & Paste or a url link). Jan 29, 2023 at 12:37
  • 2
    Having seen the revised text, I think it's almost 100% certain that your colleague is asking under what circumstances can / should Company A's executives (sitting on the board of Company B?) tell people in their own (Company A) HQ about things they learn while sitting in on Company B board meetings. But this is potentially a legal minefield, so you shouldn't trust any interpretations here. If the two companies are commercially separate, they should get lawyers to draw up a mutually agreed (boilerplate?) description of "the rules" for commercially sensitive information disclosure. Jan 29, 2023 at 12:56
  • 1
    This kind of text isn't suitable for "learning English". Most of what I think comes from having worked for decades as a subcontractor to many different companies, most of whom would have dearly loved to pump me for any information I learned while subcontracting to their rivals! It's a matter of knowing about commercial relationships, not English. Jan 29, 2023 at 13:16

1 Answer 1

1

As the Cambridge dictionary explains,, the word "requirement" can mean "an official rule about something that it is necessary to have or to do." That is what "requirement" means in this context; your colleague is asking about the rules requiring a board member to report something to A.

2
  • Are they the rules that require a board member to report something to A or the rules when a board member has to comply with when they reports something to A?
    – EPRAIT
    Jan 30, 2023 at 4:05
  • 1
    The former; they are rules that require a board member to report something to A.
    – alphabet
    Jan 30, 2023 at 12:39

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .