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Is it grammatically correct to form a sentence like this?

In English I know for sure that this word means ...

It differs from the 'textbook' way of saying the sentence, which would be

I know for sure that in English this word means ...

So my question is can you say it this way? Does it sound right or I should better stick with textbook-like way of saying it?

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    In English refers to the meaning and not to your knowledge, so your version is rather odd without punctuation. However, you could separate I know for sure between commas, dashes or brackets. "In English, I know, this word means..." Jan 31, 2023 at 19:05
  • @KateBunting "refers to the meaning and not to your knowledge"? For some reason I can't comprehend the meaning of this phrase neither by myself nor by using online translators. Could you explain what you meant? Feb 1, 2023 at 9:54
  • I was trying to express that the sense of the sentence is In English this means..., and not In English I know, so the 'textbook' version is more natural. Feb 1, 2023 at 10:04
  • @KateBunting thank you! I think I got it Feb 28, 2023 at 17:52

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The suggested example:

(1) In English I know for sure that this word means ...

is not grammatically incorrect. It is, perhaps, a bit awkward. The suggestion by
Kate Bunting of:

(2) In English, I know, this word means...

is better, I agree.

There is jo rule against starting with the subject area, like "In English"

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