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oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com:
a definition:
to dream — [intransitive, transitive] to experience a series of images, events and feelings in your mind while you are asleep
an example:
to dream something: (1) Did it really happen or did I just dream it?

I made up some sentences similar to (1):
(2) I dreamed my friends.
(3) I dreamed my house.
(4) I dreamed my dog.

Are (2), (3) and (4) correct?
If not, then why not?


oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com:
a definition:
to dream — [intransitive, transitive] to imagine and think about something that you would like to happen
an example:
to dream something: (5) Who'd have dreamt it? They're getting married.

I made up some sentences similar to (5):
(6) I dreamed a good job.
(7) I dreamed a big salary.

Are (6) and (7) correct?
If not, then why not?

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  • When describing a dream experienced during sleep, we talk about something that happened, usually with a complete sentence, e.g. I dreamed that I was naked in front of the whole school, that I was a rich man, that my dog could speak, that I was being chased by giant toads. Thus none of your examples would be natural. Commented Feb 5, 2023 at 19:39
  • Oxford Learners' Dictionary actually gives examples of the correct usage - I dreamed about X or I dreamed of X. Commented Feb 6, 2023 at 9:29
  • @KateBunting But my question is about "to dream X". It has nothing to do with "to dream about/of X".
    – Loviii
    Commented Feb 6, 2023 at 10:17
  • 1
    As James says, the only direct object we can use with dream is it or a clause that [something happened]. Commented Feb 6, 2023 at 10:27

1 Answer 1

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All of 2-7 are non-idiomatic.

The object of "dream" should be a content clause "I dreamed that my friend were with me". Or an "about PP": "I dreamed about my friends".

The "did you dream it" is an idiom, and doesn't generalise.

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