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What is the difference between dinner and supper?
I understand both as the same meal.

In The Hound of the Baskervilles, there is this sentence:

And now, if we are too late for dinner, I think that we are both ready for our suppers.
Source: The Hound of the Baskervilles

From this sentence, it seems like you're supposed to have dinner, and then have supper?
I am really confused.

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    Note the comments that "supper" is not something you will generally hear in America. Since it is so infrequently used, those infrequent usages are often referencing "The Last Supper". "Dinner" is used almost exclusively in American English at this time. When I was a kid I occasionally remember "supper" was used sometimes by the older people in the Southern US... but I am currently living in the Southern US and haven't heard it spoken in years. – HostileFork Sep 12 '14 at 3:50
  • @HostileFork My grandmother is from NE USA and she would use dinner for lunch and supper for the meal after. – Andy Jun 29 '15 at 0:42
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Dinner is usually taken in the evenings or noon (according to some cultures) is the main meal of the day. However supper is a light meal that is taken in the evenings (for example, before bed-time) .

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