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I have learnt about the present perfect tense which uses the structure S(single) + has PP + since the time clause. However, when it comes to a reading lesson I have, there is a sentence on the page that seems strange to me. I couldn't analyze it myself. I really appreciate it if you explain it to me.

In 2015, Max Stossel, 28, had an awakening. He was a successful social media strategist working with major multinational companies. But that same year, he realized that some of the work he was doing wasn't actually in people's best interests. Stossel has since become a pivotal part of the Time Well Spent movement. It "aims to align technology with our human values."

source https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/article/0a0cb73c-a87a-4c23-8b1d-f145ab76e58b

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  • He became part of the movement some time after he was "awakened" in 2015. Commented Feb 14, 2023 at 4:11
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    Please indicate which text you've quoted (if it's the entire second paragraph, then I'd put it into a block quote) and provide a citation. Commented Feb 14, 2023 at 6:57

3 Answers 3

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"Since" is here being used as an adverb, not as a preposition. As an adverb, "since" in this context means "after a (specific) time in the past" or "subsequently."

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The only oddity here is the adverb "since". It is fairly common for prepostions to become adverbs in English but simply allowing their object to be implied. And as an adverb it has crept forward (adverbs are lightweight and tend to do this). So you can understand the sentence as being equivalent to

Stossel has become a pivotal part of the Time Well Spent movement since the time that he realized that some of the work he was doing wasn't actually in people's best interests.

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  • Stossel has since become a pivotal part of the Time Well Spent movement.

has become is present prefect here.

This use of since has become standardized for this meaning:

*Stossel has since [then] become a pivotal part of the Time Well Spent movement. OR

  • Stossel has become a pivotal part of the Time Well Spent movement since then.

'since then' / 'ever since' Note that since can also be used as an adverb. Since then refers to a particular point in time and ever since to a period of time. Which one we use depends on whether we want to focus attention on the point in time or on the continuing period of time

BBC English

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