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an advanced student at a university who is given money to pay for food, housing, etc. : a graduate student who has been granted a fellowship


Does "to" mean "with which they could" or "in order to"?

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    The meaning of your two analyses is the same. The purpose of the money is the same as the purpose of giving them the money. So I don't know how much you will learn from this particular example.
    – James K
    Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 15:24
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    It might help to note that the "adverb of purpose" element to pay for food, housing, etc. is syntactically optional. But the "head noun" of the noun phrase for what was given (money) must be present or it won't be syntactically valid. Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 15:40
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    It means in order to pay or for the purpose of paying. Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 15:53
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    Syntactically speaking, it's the same to in both parsings, because whether it adjectivally modifies money or adverbially modifies given, the word to is in both cases an infinitive verb marker. Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 15:58
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    I don't understand what you're getting at. It's the "advanced student" who pays - using money given ton him by persons unspecified. I hope that by now you understand that (to Anglophones, at least) "an effort to do something" and "in order to [do something]" are the same thing. And in most contexts where to means in order to, it's entirely a stylistic choice whether to use one word or three. Commented Mar 12, 2023 at 20:11

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It means both because they are both the same:

... an advanced student at a university who is given money which he can use to pay for food, housing, etc.

... an advanced student at a university who is given money in order to to pay for food, housing, etc.

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