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I've been reading some answers about when to use 'as of' and 'from', but I still have doubts about when to use each one. e.g.:

You can check-in from 3pm

OR

You can check in as of 3pm

For me (My native language is Portuguese) the first option sounds more natural but I'm not sure if both are correct.

And in this case:

From now and onward the prices will increase a lot.

OR

As of and onward the prices will increase a lot.

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  • The first one sounds much more natural to me too, but I'm not sure why as of 3 pm doesn't sound right. We say from now on rather than and onward, but as of now can mean starting from now. Feb 18, 2023 at 12:06

1 Answer 1

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"From x" indicates that "x" is an origin. Your first sentence is therefore correct, since the check-in time apparently begins at 3:00 pm and extends until some later time.

"As of" merely denotes a particular time. For example:

I arrived at 3:05 pm and wasn't able to check in, but my friend had arrived earlier and was still able to check in as of 3:00 pm.

With "as of", the sense of a beginning time or a concluding time (when it exists) is usually inferred from context. In your second example sentence (which is also correct), "as of" seems to indicate a beginning time.


From now and onward the prices will increase a lot.

This is correct except for "and". The usual expression is "from now onward".

As of and onward the prices will increase a lot.

This is incorrect, because "as of" requires an object (complement). It doesn't have one here.

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