1

I am trying to find equivalents for the question "Is it possible that there would be no English lesson tomorrow?" using modals may/might.

I have brought out the following patterns that, I am not sure, convey the same meaning as my question does:

  1. May it be no English lesson tomorrow?
  2. Might it be no English lesson tomorrow?
  3. May no English lesson be tomorrow?
  4. Might no English lesson be tomorrow?
  5. May there be no English lesson tomorrow?
  6. Might there be no English lesson tomorrow?

Which of them are possible to be put in instead of "Is it possible that there would be no English lesson tomorrow?"?

And what differences of sense tints do they have?

3
  • Spelling: "English" always has a capital "E"
    – James K
    Feb 19, 2023 at 20:29
  • 1
    @James K I am correcting it right on the spot.
    – Eugene
    Feb 19, 2023 at 20:35
  • (6) is the only one that I find at all idiomatic. Feb 20, 2023 at 9:54

1 Answer 1

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To express future uncertainty, use "might". It avoids all ambiguity with the sense of "may" meaning "permission".

Since you are asking about the existence of the English class, you should use "Might there be..."

But none of the expressions are particularly idiomatic. It would be much better to say

Might the English class be cancelled?

or, since anything in the future is understood to be uncertain to some extent.

Will there be no English class? Will the English class be cancelled?

That is probably better, in this context, than using "might".

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  • Thank you. If "there" is swapped with "it" and the question turns into: "Will it be no English class tomorrow?", what sense may it accrue?
    – Eugene
    Feb 19, 2023 at 20:51
  • That is unlikely to be correct English, in any context.
    – James K
    Feb 19, 2023 at 21:01

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