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Example of usage of off from in context:

Compensatory time off for travel may be used by an employee when the employee is granted time off from his or her scheduled tour of duty established for leave purposes.

Example of usage of off of in context:

Sarah Palin was nearly pulled off of Fox News because she announced that she was not running for president on a rival broadcaster.

Would it be okay to say instead that Sarah Palin was nearly pulled off from Fox News or that the employee is granted time off of his or her scheduled tour?

Are off of and off from interchangeable?

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    Off of means the same as off in contexts like this. Merriam-Webster says it's more common in American English, but I've heard people from South-East England use it too. Commented Feb 25, 2023 at 16:35
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    Does this answer your question? Jump off of \ jump off the rock. Also What does "off of" mean? and "On" vs. "Off of" vs. "Off", among others. Commented Feb 25, 2023 at 17:20
  • @FumbleFingers None of those address the "off from" part of my question. Commented Feb 25, 2023 at 17:27
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    In your context, off from illustrates almost exactly the same principle as off of = off. The difference is that off from = off = from (i.e. - either of those prepositions can be used on its own in your exact context, but there may be other contexts where that's not quite true). Many, many prepositions in English can be "doubled up" like this without affecting the meaning, so we can't really have a separate question for each such permutation. Commented Feb 25, 2023 at 17:38
  • ... Should there be only one preposition in the following sentence: from or on? specifically addresses off or off from, but it's a slightly different context. Commented Feb 25, 2023 at 17:52

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