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Lately, I came upon a sentence in a story I read, which caught my attention.

FEARFUL, THE HUNTER FLED THROUGH JUNGLE

It is understandable for me, if the sentence is modified as follows:

BEING fearful, The hunter fled through jungle.

What is the grammar behind this to omit the participle being?

Is this omission only possible, if only adjective comes before the subject?

What if I say reversing the order
"FLED THROUGH THE JUNGLE THE HUNTER, FEARFUL"?

Clarification will be very helpful indeed.

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  • Hungry/Looking for breakfast/Unmotivated/Bored/Enjoying the morning, I entered the kitchen. It's a very common construction. Mar 6, 2023 at 19:10

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What is the grammar behind this to omit the participle being?

The participle is not required; many adjectival phrases could work in the first position. John Lawler gave some examples in a comment:

Hungry/Looking for breakfast/Unmotivated/Bored/Enjoying the morning, I entered the kitchen.

You can see that present participles, past participles, and adjectives can work there. That adjectival constituent modifies the following nominal phrase ("the hunter" or "I"). (Some people might say that it is the remainder of a verbless clause or have other explanations; there isn't any single interpretation that everyone agrees on.)


Is this omission only possible, if only adjective comes before the subject?

No. We could also write:

The hunter, fearful, fled through jungle.
The hunter fled through jungle, fearful.


What if I say reversing the order
"FLED THROUGH THE JUNGLE THE HUNTER, FEARFUL"?

This does not make sense, since it does not follow the common rules of English word-order. (In a declarative clause, the subject usually precedes the verb.)

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