1

The door creaked open.

  1. Could you explain what part of speech is "open"? Adjective? If I understand right, "creacked" is a verb in the sentence. Is it idiomatic to use an adjective after this verb? On the internet I've read that typically we use an adjective after "be" or “sense” verbs. Obviously, "creaked" is not from that group of verbs.

  2. What's the difference in its meaning between:

The door creaked open.

The door opened with a creak.

I don't see the difference in the meaning.

4
  • 3
    You don't see the difference in the meaning because there isn't one. Except that creaked open is a slightly more poetic / literary usage. Mar 20, 2023 at 23:58
  • 1
    Note that without the adverbial element (open), the verb to creak used intransitively doesn't particularly imply a subject like a door or a floorboard actually moving much, if at all. Even a locked door can creak - especially in the context of high winds. But the transitive usage (He creaked the door open) doesn't seem possible without an adverbial element specifically indicating movement (...open, ...shut, ...back and forth). Mar 21, 2023 at 0:17
  • 2
    Open is an adjective, used as a resultative marker indicating the state resulting from the noisy movement of the door. If you want to call it an adverb, go right ahead; there's not much difference in English, and parts of speech are like underwear; you can change them whenever you want. Mar 21, 2023 at 17:32
  • 1
    Yes, an adjective functioning as a predicative adjunct. It entails "the door creaked"
    – BillJ
    Mar 21, 2023 at 18:08

1 Answer 1

0

Could you explain what part of speech is "open"?

In a comment, @John Lawler replied:

Open is an adjective, used as a resultative marker indicating the state resulting from the noisy movement of the door. If you want to call it an adverb, go right ahead; there's not much difference in English, and parts of speech are like underwear; you can change them whenever you want.

What's the difference in its meaning between "The door creaked open." and "The door opened with a creak."?

In comments, @FumbleFingers replied:

You don't see the difference in the meaning because there isn't one. Except that creaked open is a slightly more poetic / literary usage.

Note that without the adverbial element (open), the verb to creak used intransitively doesn't particularly imply a subject like a door or a floorboard actually moving much, if at all. Even a locked door can creak - especially in the context of high winds. But the transitive usage (He creaked the door open) doesn't seem possible without an adverbial element specifically indicating movement (...open, ...shut, ...back and forth).

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .