1

I read somewhere that "some fact". But actually, I heard that in a video. Is it appropriate to say that I read somewhere in an informal conversation and avoid being so precise?

1
  • 1
    No. But if you've forgotten whether you read or heard "some fact", you might want to play safe and say you came across it. Mar 21, 2023 at 18:17

1 Answer 1

2

Short answer: No. Most people would consider that to be misleading. If you say you read something, that means you read the printed word.

However, we do use the word 'hear' (and the past tense 'heard') more loosely, for example "I hear good things about that new restaurant" could mean you've read good reviews, been told something word of mouth, or seen something on TV. For some reason, in that kind of context, 'hear' extends slightly beyond what is perceived aurally and can cover information received in general.

So, if you said "I heard [x]" that wouldn't necessarily exclude the possibility you read it.

2
  • 1
    And be careful using the word fact for something that you heard or read. If you say it's a fact, you are asserting that you are personally certain that it's true. That's not always the case when you read or hear some assertion. Don't use fact unless you want to be responsible for its truth. Mar 21, 2023 at 17:28
  • Or you could say "I saw ___" - that could cover either reading it or watching it in a video.
    – stangdon
    Mar 21, 2023 at 17:40

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .